Seven Signs You Need a New Roof – NRCA Offers Additional Advice to Consumers for Roof System Inspection and Repair

“Seven Signs You Need a New Roof,” an article posted on BobVila.com, a blog for home improvement television show host Bob Vila on April 10, 2015, advises homeowners on steps they can take to repair their roof systems before they begin to leak.

The post cites NRCA’s recommendation that homeowners should perform regular roof system inspections twice per year in the spring and fall.

To view the post in its entirety, click below.

In addition to the seven signs mentioned, NRCA offers these additional recommendations:

  • Homeowners should consider using a professional roofing contractor to perform roof system inspections. Experience and training in safe work practices makes a professional roofing contractor better suited to performing inspections involving climbing into attics and onto roofs.
  • A ladder should have solid footing and be spaced 1 foot away from the building for every 4 feet of building height.
  • BobVila.com states that if an asphalt roof system is shedding a lot of granules, it may be at the end of its useful life. However, recently installed asphalt shingles will shed some of their surfacing granules and these may collect in gutters, which typically is nothing of concern. With new asphalt shingles, excess granules are trapped between granules firmly embedded in the product and will be lost in the first months after installation.
  • The article also advises if a roof system is sagging, a homeowner should check the roof surface for signs of trapped moisture, rotting boards, or sagging spots. NRCA does not recommend a homeowner perform this type of inspection. A sagging roof may indicate damaged roof sheathing or rafters. Homeowners should not climb on roofs as the roof may not be able to support a person’s weight. In this scenario, homeowners should always call a professional roofing contractor.

To locate an NRCA member contractor, visit www.everybodyneedsaroof.com.

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